Author Interview with Evie Marceau

Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house.

Evie: I once went to Paris, not as an ode to any one book, but to explore all the quirky little French bookstores. And I even got to visit some castles’ grand libraries. I think I was living out a Belle from Beauty and the Beast fantasy!


Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

Evie: My latest book in the Fae of Manhattan series takes place in Tuscany, and I’ve become obsessed with the idea of spending a year writing in an Italian villa!


Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?

Evie: I take a lot of inspiration from books, TV shows, and movies I admire. I’ll go online and visit fan sites dedicated to those other stories. Seeing how much stories mean to an audience inspires me to create something special.


Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?

Evie: I’m a major plotter. I’ve built out all my fantasy worlds and rules of magic far in advance of ever writing a word.


Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?

Evie: I usually have a black cat asleep in my lap while I’m writing!


Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?

Evie: I adore dark romance with a touch of magic. Something about the combination of danger and romance really grabs me.


Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

Evie: I think when you read enough fiction in the same genre you write in, you get an innate sense of what readers expect, so you can bring original ideas that will still deliver everything a reader hopes to find.


Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

Evie: Don’t try to write a book that will please everyone. Write the book of your heart, and it will find its readers, even if it’s a small but dedicated niche.


Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Evie: Early in my writing journey, I paid $50 for an editor’s critique of the first thing I ever wrote. She ripped it apart (nicely) and gave me so much mind-blowing valuable writing advice that helped me strengthen my craft.


Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

Evie: Since my black cat is often with me while I write, I’ll go with a black cat.


Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?

Evie: Currently, I’m working on two Vella series: The Castles of the Eyrie series and the Fae of Manhattan series. As I finish each book within the series, I publish it as an ebook/paperback as well.


Day: What does literary success look like to you?

Evie: Hearing from readers! Getting emails, fan art, and even seeing cosplay costumes of my characters feels amazing.


Day: What’s the best way to market your books?

Evie: Marketing Vella series can be a challenge. I’ve had the most success with Facebook ads.


Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Evie: Before I begin writing, I’ll do just enough research to make sure my plot and setting work–then I’ll write the book, doing some research as I go along, and then do a final polish at the end.


Day: How many hours a day do you write?

Evie: I tend to write in bursts. No writing at all for two or three days, then a few days of 10,000+ words.


Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

Evie: Absolutely! I sneak little easter eggs into my books for my VIP Reader Group. I’ve also held contests within the VIP Reader Group to have them name characters and locations.


Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write? 

Evie: There is a death scene near the beginning of Scarbound (Castles of the Eyrie Book Two) that broke my heart to write.


Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?

Evie: I’m at my most creative first thing in the morning. In the afternoons, my brain tends to turn to mush, so that’s when I do marketing or research. Then sometimes before bed, I will edit.


Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

Evie: It’s been said that readers come for the premise but stay for the characters. I think that’s true. Every book needs a great idea to hook readers, but if the characters aren’t compelling, no one will care or remember what happens to them. 


Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?

Evie: Lately, I’ve been devouring Elizabeth Ash’s Vella series!


Evie’s Vellas are:

Wilde City (A Modern Fae Romance)

When Willow answers a mysterious nanny ad, she’s shocked that the employer is the handsome and reclusive billionaire Severn Wilde–and even more surprised to discover he’s a fae prince in disguise. But as wondrous as Severn’s realm is, rival fae courts, witches, and shifters make it a risky job–though falling for her magical boss might be the greatest danger of all.

SCARLIGHT

As a child, Bryn was saved from wolves by a prince from a rival kingdom. Rangar’s people believe that a life saved is a soul owned, and ten years later, Rangar comes back for Bryn. Swept away to his seaside kingdom, Bryn falls under the spell of the wild Baer lands and the three magical brothers who rule it. But which prince will end up with her hand–and her heart–not even magic can foretell. 


You can find Evie on: Instagram, Her Website, Facebook, and TicToc.

Author Interview with K. Thomas

1.     Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house. 

K: I really haven’t. Most of my favorite authors are still living, and I feel invasive enough just following them on social media. I don’t know that I’d do much more than visit a gravesite when they passed. 


2.     Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

K: Any major metropolis would be fun. New York, Seoul, Paris—anything where you have a lot of movement but could find quiet, local treasures.


3.     Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?

K: Right, so every time I try to force myself to write. I reread my prior books or stories. Putting yourself back into the characters as a reader, with no pressure for word count, really helps make you think of things you want to happen. 


4.     Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?

K: Mostly a Pantser. I high-level know where things are going, but how I get there is anyone’s guess. 


5.     Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?

K: Probably how I write everything out of order. Whatever scene comes to me gets put down, then I connect the ones I want to keep and fill in the gaps. 


6.     Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?

K: Paranormal Romance is usually my go-to. When I read, it’s usually to relax and decompress, so I want a happy ending. Paranormal and fantasy romance means you get the happily-ever-after and the plot conflict is (usually) outside of the romantic relationship, which I find less stressful. 


7.     Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

K: The quick answer is that I like tropes, so it’s probably the latter. The tricky thing about giving readers “what they want,” though, is remembering just because someone reads your book, it does not make them your target reader. So, it’s best to just write what you want to happen and don’t worry about what everyone will think.


8.     Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

K: Don’t stop writing.


9.     Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

K: $35 on a snarky teacup about killing people off in books. Just kidding. Editing. There is something armor-like in knowing you used editing software and three other people checked your work when someone finds the inevitable errors. It makes you feel less alone in your imperfection (plus, it’s just one error and not a hundred!).


10.  Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

K: Is a teacup eligible?


11.  Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?

K: I’ve finished the first two books in my Time to Wake trilogy. The third is in process. I just started my Vella story, and since you have to write in order, it’s been a challenge to finish!


12.  Day: What does literary success look like to you?

K: Every time I think, “This is it. I’ve made it!” something new happens. For me, being in a library, a book box, having people love my writing, and ask when they’ll have something new is success. Being in the top 1% of millionaire best-selling authors is not a success, it’s a miracle, so I’m happy! It’s all about the baby steps.


13.  Day: What’s the best way to market your books?

K: For my genres (paranormal romance and urban fantasy), I find sneak peeks, and tidbits from the books work best. Let people read a little, and then they want to know more.


14.  Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

K: So much research. There is a two-word phrase in my second book I spent three months researching the Etruscan language to use. It’s a problem.


15.  Day: How many hours a day do you write?

K: I’m a binge-writer, so I don’t write every day. When I do write, I sit down and finish 5-10k words at a time.


16.  Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

K: Yes. Many, many secrets. The books are practically 80k words of inside jokes.


17.  Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write?

K: A character near death. I’ve had a couple, and I think I cried during both for different reasons.


18.  Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?

 K: Late at night. I don’t really have a choice. It’s when my brain cooperates.


19.  Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

 K: Selfishly, I’m going to say strong characters since that’s what I focus on writing and like to read.


20.  Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?

K: R. Raeta! She writes my favorite book boyfriends.


K. Thomas’ Kindle Vella is:

Changeling Exchange

What if the Fae controlled the world’s currency, and humanity’s fate was in the hands of a magic addict, a car thief, and the one creature that just wants to be human? An heir on the run. A heist gone awry. And a childhood romance that will be their salvation or start a war.


Her books are:

Time to Wake

Time to Wake is the award-winning first book in the Time to Wake Series.

Senlis is your typical artist. Empath, hater of mornings, and the bearer of a strange name passed down from her grandmother. With a penchant for caffeine and a pet ghost, she’s just trying to live her best life.

Did she mention she also happens to devour souls? No? Well, it’s a bit of a conversation killer… no pun intended.

When new neighbors move in across the street, Senlis strikes up an unexpected friendship with the equally quirky Katie. The two get mixed up in a party circuit that leaves a string of missing girls– and a trail back to Senlis’ less than human origins. At the center of it all is Hunter: a guy not smart enough to keep his distance. He’s arrogant, frustrating, and terribly distracting… Just, please don’t tell anyone she admitted that last part.

Is Hunter involved in the mysterious murders? Or is he just in the wrong place at the right time?

As she tries to figure out Hunter’s motives, Senlis ends up learning what it means to be a Nephilim, and how her past is playing a role in the murders. “Time to Wake” is the first book of a new-adult paranormal romance series brimming with suspense and quirky laughs!

Not Right Now

Book two of the Time to Wake series unravels the deep history between the characters while taking readers further into the lore and world of the Nephilim, with our favorite snarky caffeine-addict leading the way.


You can find K. Thomas on Facebook, Amazon, Twitter, Instagram, her Website, and Tictoc.


Author Interview with Tricia Schneider

Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house.

Tricia: I don’t have to go far. I live minutes away from Pottsville, Pennsylvania, perhaps best known in the literary world as the home of John O’Hara, author of Appointment in Samarra and Butterfield. He based his popular book, Gibbsville, on his hometown of Pottsville and the residents there.


Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

Tricia: I have written books that take place in London, England, but I’ve never set foot there. Although, I’ve done a ton of research, I would love nothing more than to visit the place. Spending a year in London, or anywhere in the United Kingdom, would be a dream come true!
 


Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?


Tricia: This happens more often than I care for, to be honest. I have several methods to work through this. The best for me is taking a walk, going for a drive (although with gas prices these days – not so much lately), or taking a long shower. These work wonders for my creativity. I can usually work through any blocks or plot problems that come my way.
 


Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?


Tricia: I call myself a Planster. A combination of the two work best for me. When I create a story, I write everything I know about it, from characters, setting, plot, you name it. I’ll create an outline with the information I have. Typically, there are big gaping holes where I don’t know what happens. Those get filled in as I write. Most times, I have to go back and fix things as I learn more about the characters and the story. But writing this way gives me a semblance of structure and a vague guide, but still leaves a lot of surprises and what happens next questions that I love to see answered.


Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?


Tricia: I’m not sure I have any unusual writing quirks. Sometimes, I think I’m rather boring. But I will share my experience with my writing space this last summer. I spent days cleaning out my small walk-in closet to convert half of it into an office space where I might escape from my noisy family to get my writing done. It’s beautiful with a small desk, pretty lights and a comfy chair. I was so happy when I finished, imagining my days hidden away, typing my stories. Yeah, it didn’t work out like that. My office isn’t soundproof, so the noises from the household still distract me. Plus, my 7-year-old doesn’t understand the concept of mommy-needs-to-work, so there’s plenty of distraction from him playing with his toys in my office while I’m trying to write. While I haven’t abandoned it completely, I’ve gone back to writing on my bed with my laptop or the sofa in the living room, wearing headphones to block the noise around me.


Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?


Tricia: I’m an avid reader, and I’ll read anything, but romance is by far my favorite. Any kind of romance. Historical, paranormal, contemporary, it doesn’t matter. I crave that happily-ever-after story. This world is filled with so many uncertainties. I need to know the characters I read about will find their happy-ever-afters since none are guaranteed in real life.


Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?


Tricia: Probably a combination of the two. I want to write a story that will resonate with readers, but I like to put a fresh, unique spin on my stories. Romance is filled with tropes such as enemies to lovers, arranged marriages, or second-chance love. I like to play with these tropes and see what new twists I can create with them.


Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?


Tricia: Stop doubting yourself. Just go for it. You can do it!


Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?


Tricia: The best money I ever spent was on the few writer’s conferences I went to when I was younger and learning about the publishing industry. I met so many people, authors, and aspiring writers, and I learned a great deal from them. Attending those conferences in my early days really impacted me in a wonderful way and led me on the journey I’m currently on.


Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?


Tricia: I’m not sure I would pick it for myself, but I think a spider picked me. The year I first became published, I kept encountering yellow garden spiders. These spiders are also known as writing spiders. Yes, I had to look it up. When I saw the name, I felt like someone was trying to send me a message. They are orb weavers, which means they create beautiful, intricate webs. I found several in my garden and front porch that year. Also, I found one crawling on my leg while I was driving my son home from preschool one day. No, I didn’t freak out, but it’s a good thing I like spiders! �� I think the spirits were definitely trying to get my attention.


Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?


Tricia: I’ve been published with The Wild Rose Press and some other indie publishers. I have several paranormal, historical, sci-fi, and fantasy romances published with varying lengths and heat levels. Novels to short stories. Steamy to sweet. Kindle Vella is my newest venture. Right now, I have one Vella published called Into the Dark. But I’m working on more to schedule for next year.


Day: What does literary success look like to you?


Tricia: I already feel successful. For me, I have many milestones on the way to a top goal. I’ve accomplished some such as getting a book written (yes, that counts as a success!), getting published, and making it onto the USA Today Bestseller’s list. My ultimate goal is to make enough income with my writing to pay my bills. That’s always been my dream.


Day: What’s the best way to market your books?

Tricia: I’ve been doing this for a while, but I still feel like I’m learning as I go. There are so many methods, and what works for one author may not work for another. I’ve had good luck with my newsletter subscribers and word of mouth.


Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Tricia: It depends on the book. I’ve spent hours reading nonfiction books and searching online articles for my historical romances. I try my best to be as accurate as possible with historical detail. With my paranormal romances, I’ve researched books about mythological and magical creatures. If I can, I like to travel to the locations for the settings of my stories. It’s wonderful to walk the same streets as my characters.
 


Day: How many hours a day do you write?


Tricia: I’m a single mom with four children between the ages of 16 and 7. My writing hours vary greatly. Over the years, I’ve learned to be flexible. Sometimes, I get an hour, and other days I might have five hours. I don’t have a set schedule. My best time for writing in the summer was early in the morning every day while my kids were asleep. Now that they’re back in school, I write more during the weekdays.


Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?


Tricia: Yes. I love Easter eggs! Most of my stories are interconnected in small ways, whether it’s a setting or a character. Just something minor that ties them together. Another little secret in my writing is the names I use for my characters. I grew up in the ’80s watching re-runs of the 1960s TV drama, Dark Shadows. My mother got me hooked on that show, and it influenced my life in a huge way during my formative years. My passion for the supernatural stems from storylines involving vampires, witches, werewolves, ghosts, curses, time travel, and more. To pay homage to my favorite show, I borrow names of the characters and the actors who played them and use at least one in each of my books, first or last name. It’s not something obvious, but it’s a secret that I think only Dark Shadows fans might catch if they were looking closely.


Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write?


Tricia: Anything involving the death of a loved one. My mother died from leukemia when I was 11. It’s difficult to write about loss as it brings strong memories. I discovered quite accidentally that nearly all the heroines in my stories have suffered the loss of their mother. It might not always pertain to the plot in a huge way, but I didn’t even realize I wrote them like that until someone close to me pointed it out.


Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?
 
Tricia: My favorite time to write is whenever I’m alone in my house or when my kids are asleep. That’s the only time it’s quiet and peaceful, so I can lose myself in my story. Having four children, there’s rarely a moment when there’s not noise or chaos. Also, my house has become a haven for some of the neighborhood kids, so I typically have more than just my children in my home. At least two or three others call my house a second home and spend a lot of time with us. So much that they’ve become like part of my family. When I say it’s beyond noisy at my house, I’m not exaggerating!


Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

Tricia: All three would be best! Usually, when I’m developing my stories, I start with the characters. I spend a lot of time learning who they are and what makes them tick. I think readers really connect with strong characters who will share their journey and take them through the epic settings and mind-blowing plot twists.


Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?


Tricia: My bestie author buddy is the amazing Ash Krafton. She’s a USA Today bestselling and award-winning author who writes speculative fiction. I’ve known her since my Waldenbooks days while I worked at the local mall. She’s not only a brilliant writer but a fantastic friend! You must check out her Demimonde series. And, I admit, I might have a teeny bit of a crush on the exorcist mage, Simon Alliant, from The Demon Whisperer series. I’m not ashamed to say that I’ve re-read those books multiple times!


Thank you so much for the interview! This was fun!


If you’re interested in learning more about Tricia’s work,

Check out her Kindle Vella:

Into the Dark

Trapped in a dimension where magic feeds from the living, Allison must trust a stranger to help her survive in this terrifying reality. Brian has lost all hope of escape. Finding Allison has given him new purpose to keep going, but for how long? As they search for a way out of this nightmarish world, will they sacrifice their newfound feelings for each other for a chance to return home? Or will they remain trapped in a world where the dead walk among the living?

To see her USA Today bestselling books, check out Tricia’s website or her blog.

And in between deadlines, she’s usually hanging out at one of these social media sites:
Facebook
Twitter
Goodreads
Bookbub
Instagram

Death’s Heir- A Kindle Vella Story

Lady Clarissa Drake can see ghosts, an ability that landed her mother in an insane asylum. To escape the stigma of her mother’s shame, she travels to America to meet her hopeful intended, but things don’t go according to plan when the ghost of his bastard half-brother’s mother shows up and forces her to confront her gift.

Click on the picture to start reading!

It’s Release Day for my new Kindle Vella, Nephilim Rising!

Kira is a witch, and like all Paras, she grew up hearing about the boogeymen of the paranormal world, the Nephilim. The gatekeepers between the human world and the paranormal world. Legend states that long ago, they took it upon themselves to be the guardians of the human world, protecting humans from Paras and keeping the vast human population from discovering the paranormal world hidden in plain sight. But the Nephilim are just a legend, a myth, invented to scare young Paras, right?

Coming September 1st: Nephilim Rising

A #paranormalromance #kindleVella story from @DayParkertales.

Kira is a witch, and like all Paras, she grew up hearing about the boogeymen of the paranormal world, the Nephilim. The gatekeepers between the human world and the paranormal world. Legend states that long ago, they took it upon themselves to be the guardians of the human world, protecting humans from Paras and keeping the vast human population from discovering the paranormal world hidden in plain sight. But the Nephilim are just a legend, a myth, invented to scare young Paras, right?