Author Interview with Aella Black


Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house.


Aella: I’ve been to Concord, Massachusetts, home of Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. The Alcott house is worth going to see! My dream literary pilgrimage is to England to do a Jane Austen tour, as well as C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien in Oxford.


Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?


Aella: I feel fortunate to have already lived on four continents, and I often “write what I know.” But I’d love to live in Scotland and perhaps use the Isle of Skye for the setting for a novel.


Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?


Aella: I’d take my dog for a walk. Getting out in nature is a necessity for me.


Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?

Aella: Both when necessary, but primarily a Pantser.


Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?


Aella: Writing while pedaling on my desk bike. Not sure if that’s a quirk, but it’s unusual.


Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?

Aella: Honestly, my mood changes from week to week. Romance is a favorite, but I also love fantasy, dystopian, post-apocalyptic, and historical fiction. And all of those with at least a romance sub-plot.


Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?


Aella: Both. I always like to bring “something new to the table,” but I also understand the value of writing to market and the popularity of tropes.


Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?


Aella: Write, even when you think you don’t have time. Make time. You have so many stories to be told, and sometimes the window to tell those stories closes and won’t reopen. Tell them now.


Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?


Aella: ProWritingAid (editing software) and Vellum (formatting software)


Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?


Aella: A dog, maybe? Niko (my dearly departed German shepherd) and Travis Barker (my current senior rescue) have been the best writing buds anyone could ask for, so they deserve mascot status.


Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?


Aella: 4 published books (a trilogy & a novella), and 1 finished Vella (3 incomplete)


Day: What does literary success look like to you?


Aella: New York Times best-seller list. Seeing my books in a brick-and-mortar bookstore. I’m not there (yet).


Day: What’s the best way to market your books?


Aella: Social Media, newsletter promos, and paid advertising


Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Aella: I generally research as I go. Often it’s setting or job particulars.


Day: How many hours a day do you write?


Aella: Not nearly enough. I have a full-time job, so 1-2 hours maximum.


Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

Aella: No, but great idea!


Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write?


Aella: The novella I wrote called “Midnight Mayhem” takes place during a terrorist attack in Times Square on New Year’s Eve. Because that’s very much the reality we live in and could happen anywhere at any time, it was difficult to write.


Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?


Aella: I write best first thing in the morning, with a good cup of coffee (and preferably a
tasty pastry).


Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings Strong, interesting characters

Aella: Strong, interesting characters.


Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?


Aella: Yes, my writing sprint partner is Rhonda Hopkins, who has a fantastic YA paranormal cozy mystery series called the “Witches of Whispering Pines.” She and I will be co-writing a YA series, “The Gemini Prophecy” next year!


Aella’s Top 3 Vellas are:


Break Every Chain

High school senior Maverick Mason has what every guy his age wants: the girl, the grades, the god-like status. Amira Abbasi is the same age and lives in the same town, but her reality couldn’t be more different. In fact, no one outside her household knows she exists. A chance encounter may change that–will it make a difference if her fate has already been sealed?

Christmas Cruise on the Danube (Under a pen name-Selah Beckham)

Single and orphaned at thirty, Evie Broussard is afraid the holidays will never be the same. And they won’t–but that doesn’t mean she can’t start new traditions. A last-minute trip to see Christmas markets in Europe might be just what she needs. Only Evie finds things aren’t quite what she expected. Then again, nothing could have prepared her for Keller Kendrix and his crew.


Point Break (Under a pen name-Selah Beckham)

Kaden James is one surf competition from going pro when disaster strikes. Then his fiance throws salt in the open wound. With a battered body and broken heart, he may have given up, but his friends haven’t given up on him. Dakota Eriksen is just what the doctor ordered–quite literally. She has a strict hands-off policy with her PT patients, except when hands are required to do her job. Since Kaden wants nothing to do with her–or her hands–it should be easy to steer clear. Or is it?


Aella’s Top 3 Books are: (all available free with Kindle Unlimited):

Lock Down

My superpower? I can’t die. You can imagine how much it hurts when they test that out…

Phoebe Atkinson has always felt different, but in the typical angsty way most teenagers do. She had no idea just how different until that fateful day she died—and then came back to life.

It appears that sort of thing is frowned upon because Phoebe awakens to find herself locked up in Leavenworth, a notorious prison that now holds teens with supernatural abilities.

Behind bars, some are welcoming and others are… not. One group in particular seems determined to make the lives of Phoebe and her new friends as miserable as possible.

Although Phoebe’s life before being imprisoned was far from perfect, she wants it back. And she will… if they don’t find a way to kill her first.

Regardless, she’s no longer going to stand by and be the rule-follower she’s always been.

Look where that got her.


Power Up

Out of the frying pan into the fire…


Break Out

Everyone has their breaking point…


You can find Aella at: Facebook, Instagram, Website, and Tictoc.

Author Interview with Teshelle Combs

Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

Teshelle: Oh, hands down, I would go to Northern Sweden. The extreme seasons and the Midnight Sun. The Northern Lights and the ice cracking on the frozen lakes while the foxes cry out in the darkness. I would write one HECK of a story.


Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?

Teshelle: A long barefoot walk followed by a solo shower so I can play out some new scenes in my head!


Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?

Teshelle: I’m largely a pantser, but I could call myself a hybrid. I have a basic plan that I feel fine with changing if need be. And I usually outline my last few chapters or episodes to make sure I “land the plane” okay. The rest…is intuition and improv.


Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?

Teshelle: I have a little brain-hack ritual for snapping my attention back to my work whenever I get distracted (which is often).


Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?

Teshelle: I love fantasy. Especially dystopian fantasy. I really enjoy politics, world-building, delicious character development, and a juicy love interest that bends all the rules. So it’s gotta be some sort of fantasy for me!


Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?


Teshelle: I think a good writer does both. I think my readers expect (or demand at this point) for me to write something unique and original. So I need to deliver!


Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?


Teshelle: Don’t give up, silly genius. Write the darn stories.


Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?


Teshelle: Experiences! The more of the world I taste and see, the more my perspective shifts and the better writer I become.


Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?


Teshelle: A hawk. Hands down. I can see what I want from so very far away, and once I’m in motion toward it, my vision focuses impeccably fast. Also…every time I see a hawk, I pay attention to my surroundings and my life at that current moment. It’s my favorite animal.


Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?


Teshelle: I have 34 total “books” on Amazon right now. Some are poetry, one is a short story, and the rest are novels. And I have 7 vellas currently as well.


Day: What does literary success look like to you?


Teshelle: I want my stories to fuel my family’s dreams. I want my books to be the foundation for every awesome thing we do in the future.


Day: What’s the best way to market your books?


Teshelle: Talk about your books constantly. With great joy. With extreme passion. Never tire of talking about them. Find the best ways and platforms for talking about them, and then…you guessed it. Talk about them. 


Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Teshelle: I usually need to plan most of the aspects of my fantasy world before I begin. Meanings of names, cultural references, types of food, dress, greetings, customs, and societal expectations. All of these I research and map out before I start writing. Usually, some version of the story has been cooking in my mind for many months, if not years. So once I get to the research phase, it only takes a day or two. Then I’m off to writing.


Day: How many hours a day do you write?


Teshelle: It’s different every day because I have a pretty eclectic life schedule. Sometimes one hour, sometimes five.

 


Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?


Teshelle: Oh yes, DEFINITELY. I have had readers sit down together with pencils and pens and highlighters and try to find my secrets! 


Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write?

Teshelle: I am currently writing it. The final scenes in my upcoming release, Tuck Me In, are excruciating for me. I sure hope the story will be worth it. I think it’s an important one to tell.


Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?

Teshelle: I would love to write around 10am every day, but that’s when I start homeschooling the boys, so it almost never happens at that time. 


Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

Teshelle: Strong characters. If a character is strong enough, they could simply sit in a room for four hundred pages, and it would be intriguing. (Oh no. That’s a good story idea. Uh oh.)


Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?

Teshelle: I will hands down shout out my dearest friend, LM Siddens. Check out their work because they are kind and whole and also brilliant and talented.


Teshelle’s Top three Vellas are:

The First Stone

Sanaa of Rote exists only to please her father, the King, by marrying the High Prince of an allied realm. And she will succeed. She must. If she can bear to swallow her hatred for the man to whom she must yield every fragment of her power. | From the world of The First Dryad.

The First Dryad

Aia spent her life in hiding until her secret was discovered, and she was taken to the Palace in chains. Now, among the last crop of an ancient arboreal race, she will have to prove herself useful to the High Prince to survive. But alas, love is ruin. And the last of one race might become the first in another. Season 2 has begun.

Slit Throat Saga

Fantasy like you’ve never read before | They are hunting us. They are hunting me. The death sentence in my veins will stay hidden because I’m clever. Because I’m careful. Because I’m Nexus. Until the people who are supposed to love me threaten to destroy me. But you’ll see. I’ll make a way. And I’ll forge it in blood, in lies…and in metal.


Teshelle’s top three books are:

The Underglow

Aurelie Kendrick hasn’t spoken a word since she was a young girl. Lucky for her, vampires, known in her world simply as “pyres” like Alexander don’t speak either. But in a dark world where pyres are enslaved, forced to drink the blood of their masters, can the speechless find a voice?

The First Dryad

Aia spent her life in hiding…until her secret was discovered, and she was taken to the Palace in chains. Now, among the last crop of an ancient arboreal race, she will have to prove herself useful to the High Prince to survive. But alas, love is ruin. And the last of one race might become the first in another.

Slit Throat Saga

They are hunting us. They are hunting me. The death sentence in my veins will stay hidden because I’m clever. Because I’m careful. Because I’m Nexus. Until the people who are supposed to love me threaten to destroy me. But you’ll see. I’ll make a way. And I’ll forge it in blood, in lies…and in metal.


You can find Teshelle at: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Amazon Author page, and Linktree.


Author Interview with C.H. Lyn

Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house.


C.H Lyn: My sister and I spent a full weekend at a cute little bed and breakfast in Santa Cruz, CA, over the summer of 2021. It was amazing. I planned on writing a ton for my WIP at the time and ended up drafting a 4-part series with my sister instead. We haven’t gotten past the first few chapters of book one, but it’s biding its time, waiting for me to finish my current series.


Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?


C.H Lyn: Oohh, that’s a tough one. My series, Miss Belle’s Travel Guides takes place all over the world. Book one is set in Tokyo, Thailand, and New York. Book two is set in Peru and New York… I think I’d go for Europe. I’d try to slam out four books for the Travel Guides series that takes place in a bunch of different European countries.


Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?


C.H Lyn: Usually if I’ve been at the computer that long without writing, it’s because I got distracted watching Critical Role or Dimension20. The right music always helps. Some good tunes, a chocolatey snack, some tea or coffee, and I’m ready to go!


Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?


C.H Lyn: I used to be a panster, but I’m a plotter all the way. I’ve got detailed outlines for everything I’m working on. For the vellas they’re usually a simple outline. For my books, they are fully written 5 act structures, scenes, etc.


Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?


C.H Lyn: I’d have to say not getting stuck as I go. When I’m writing out the plot – sure, I spend a lot of time scratching my head about what happens next. When I’m actually writing, not so much. If I do have that moment of doubt or hesitation, I usually fill in the word – or even section – with {ELEPHANT} to replace whatever I will go back and take care of later.


Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?


C.H Lyn: So hard to answer! I write a bunch of different genres, and that’s what I like to read too! Off the top of my head: sci-fi, fantasy, dystopian, contemporary action thrillers, and anything that makes me laugh without trying too hard.


Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

C.H Lyn: I write what I want to read. I know enough people read the same books as me, that they’ll hopefully like what I’m writing too. Beyond that, I’m not trying to write for the current popular genre. Maybe someday, when I’ve run out of WIPs and backlogged projects, I’ll be able to gauge the market and pop out what is trending, but at the moment, I’m writing for the characters I want more of.


Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?


C.H Lyn: DON’T DO VANITY PUBLISHING!! Haha, but seriously. It’s a long story and one of the more expensive lessons I’ve ever learned. 19-year-old me could have used a bit of advice in that area.


Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?


C.H Lyn: My husband bought me my laptop, so I’m not sure that counts. Beyond that, I’d say the cover art I’m currently having commissioned. Based on what I’ve seen so far, it’ll definitely be worth the money.


Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?


C.H Lyn: My mascot has to be my white German Shepherd. If only because he comes to every game (writing session in my office).


Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?


C.H Lyn: I have one published book (Lacey Goes to Tokyo) and two finished Vellas, with a third releasing new episodes this month.


Day: What does literary success look like to you?


C.H Lyn: People reading my work, and not just people I know. Having book signings, merch, and a sweater with the rebel logo from my dystopian series on it. It looks like writing and publishing being my career.


Day: What’s the best way to market your books?


C.H Lyn: Ha! If I knew that, I’d tell you. From what I can tell, social media is key, but so is stuff like this. Doing interviews with fellow authors, chatting online, and making connections.


Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?


C.H Lyn: Good lordy, that’s a tough one. For Miss Belle’s Travel Guides, I do a ton of research. Hours for each book. With Book One, I did the research as I went. With Book Two, I’m actually holding off. If I need a restaurant, I leave a space to fill in later once I’ve put an hour into searching blogs and menus to find the perfect fit. For my sci-fi-fantasy/dystopian series, I don’t need much research. The usual writer stuff, how much blood loss kills you, what are the different burn levels, etc.


Day: How many hours a day do you write?


C.H Lyn: On a good day, the average is 2.5. I get a couple hours at the Y while my kids are at Learn and Play. (I love my Y, by the way. It has a cute little lounge area around a fireplace that is perfect for headphones and a laptop and diving into a story.) Then I try to do a half hour to an hour in the evening, depending on what my husband is up to. That time is generally spent with housekeeping: posting episodes to Vella, catching up on author emails, and planning social media stuff.


Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?


C.H Lyn: Oh, absolutely. I love easter eggs. There is nothing quite like a puzzle that a reader won’t realize until they go through the book a second time. I love pausing while I’m reading, flipping back a hundred pages, and having a Eureka moment. I want to deliver that to my readers as well.


Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write?


C.H Lyn: In Lacey Goes to Tokyo there is a lot of reference to abuse. I dance around it because none of my books will show graphic violence against women in that way, but it gets close sometimes. Those are difficult to write, mostly because my mind is always trying to consider what a reader will take from the scene, and I never want to cause unnecessary harm to my readers. Apart from that, Hope and Lies (Book One of the Abredea Series) has several heartbreaking scenes. Writing them isn’t as tough as the edit later on. Reading through the end of my book, when an MC dies in the arms of her grandson, makes me cry every time.


Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?


C.H Lyn: I used to be a midnight writer, staying up until 2 or 3 in the morning. Now I have two kids, haha. I do my best stuff on the weekends in the morning. Hubby watches the girls, and I hit the coffee shop (or get coffee and work in my new office). We also go to the Y in the mornings, so that automatically makes them the best time – if not technically my favorite.


Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

C.H Lyn: I think a strong character will get you through the worst plot, but an intriguing plot won’t get me past a 2-dimensional boring character. If I need to find out what happens, I’ll ask someone who reads it. Epic settings aren’t where I find myself engrossed. I love a good description, and if I’m able to live and breathe a world, it makes the book about a hundred times better. But again, none of that will matter to me if I don’t like the characters.


Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?


C.H Lyn: I’ll do ya better. I’ll shout out a few. I just finished reading Dakota Breann’s debut novel, and it was a very interesting take on a futuristic dystopian U.S. Lindz Hanson doesn’t have anything out yet, but she’s a riot on Tiktok (@bookreviewflashmob). Glint of Mischief is my cover artist, he did the art for Spooky Cat, and he is also an author. His stuff on social media is fantastic and hilarious, and his covers are gorgeous!


C.H. Lyn’s Vellas:

Abredea: Hope and Lies

No peace without order. No order without caste. Juliana believes in the system. Believes it will work for her as it always has. When she is Coded a White-Star, she realizes people in power don’t always tell the truth. Maybelle is a rebel. She has found her truth, and she will fight for it. Cho wants to survive. Wants his family to live peaceful lives. Their powers – superhuman abilities – make that life nearly impossible. Follow these three in a world where lies are abundant, and hope is rare.


Spooky Cat

Demi has always said ‘bless you’ when someone sneezes. It’s the polite thing to do. But does their cat count? When Missy sneezes, and Demi fails to utter the appropriate response, a demon takes over their cat. The unlikely pairing undertakes adventure and hilarity, battling bigots and bigger demons, to get all the things necessary for an exorcism. Because as much as Demi doesn’t want a demon in their cat, the demon wants to be there even less.


Song of the Deep

Prince Derek is set to marry Lady Lydia. Not his choice; not hers. It’s his duty, so he tries to get to know his soon-to-be bride on their trek across the sea to his kingdom. When their ship goes down, and she is lost at sea, Derek is reminded of an old tale, a legend in his lands. When a woman dies at sea, she might not be lost forever. He, and Lydia’s handmaiden, Alyana, find a sea witch to learn if this legend might be true. It might. But what will it cost to see Lydia again?


C.H. Lyn’s book series is:

Lacey Goes To Tokyo: Miss Belle’s Travel Guides

International travel means international danger.

Lacey Devaine is a four-year veteran of a spy ring which fronts as an exclusive escort service, Miss Belle’s Travel Guides. Maintaining her cover is Lacey’s number one priority to protect the integrity of the operation she works for.

While on assignment in Tokyo, a nosy newspaper reporter threatens to blow the lid off a scandal that will put dozens of innocent lives at risk. To protect her cover, Miss Belle is called in to act on intelligence Lacey has uncovered.

Can these beautiful, intelligent, and deadly women complete this assignment in time and emerge unscathed? Or will this mission be their last?


You can find C.H. Lyn at: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, TicToc, and Amazon.


Author Interview with Evie Marceau

Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house.

Evie: I once went to Paris, not as an ode to any one book, but to explore all the quirky little French bookstores. And I even got to visit some castles’ grand libraries. I think I was living out a Belle from Beauty and the Beast fantasy!


Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

Evie: My latest book in the Fae of Manhattan series takes place in Tuscany, and I’ve become obsessed with the idea of spending a year writing in an Italian villa!


Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?

Evie: I take a lot of inspiration from books, TV shows, and movies I admire. I’ll go online and visit fan sites dedicated to those other stories. Seeing how much stories mean to an audience inspires me to create something special.


Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?

Evie: I’m a major plotter. I’ve built out all my fantasy worlds and rules of magic far in advance of ever writing a word.


Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?

Evie: I usually have a black cat asleep in my lap while I’m writing!


Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?

Evie: I adore dark romance with a touch of magic. Something about the combination of danger and romance really grabs me.


Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

Evie: I think when you read enough fiction in the same genre you write in, you get an innate sense of what readers expect, so you can bring original ideas that will still deliver everything a reader hopes to find.


Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

Evie: Don’t try to write a book that will please everyone. Write the book of your heart, and it will find its readers, even if it’s a small but dedicated niche.


Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Evie: Early in my writing journey, I paid $50 for an editor’s critique of the first thing I ever wrote. She ripped it apart (nicely) and gave me so much mind-blowing valuable writing advice that helped me strengthen my craft.


Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

Evie: Since my black cat is often with me while I write, I’ll go with a black cat.


Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?

Evie: Currently, I’m working on two Vella series: The Castles of the Eyrie series and the Fae of Manhattan series. As I finish each book within the series, I publish it as an ebook/paperback as well.


Day: What does literary success look like to you?

Evie: Hearing from readers! Getting emails, fan art, and even seeing cosplay costumes of my characters feels amazing.


Day: What’s the best way to market your books?

Evie: Marketing Vella series can be a challenge. I’ve had the most success with Facebook ads.


Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Evie: Before I begin writing, I’ll do just enough research to make sure my plot and setting work–then I’ll write the book, doing some research as I go along, and then do a final polish at the end.


Day: How many hours a day do you write?

Evie: I tend to write in bursts. No writing at all for two or three days, then a few days of 10,000+ words.


Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

Evie: Absolutely! I sneak little easter eggs into my books for my VIP Reader Group. I’ve also held contests within the VIP Reader Group to have them name characters and locations.


Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write? 

Evie: There is a death scene near the beginning of Scarbound (Castles of the Eyrie Book Two) that broke my heart to write.


Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?

Evie: I’m at my most creative first thing in the morning. In the afternoons, my brain tends to turn to mush, so that’s when I do marketing or research. Then sometimes before bed, I will edit.


Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

Evie: It’s been said that readers come for the premise but stay for the characters. I think that’s true. Every book needs a great idea to hook readers, but if the characters aren’t compelling, no one will care or remember what happens to them. 


Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?

Evie: Lately, I’ve been devouring Elizabeth Ash’s Vella series!


Evie’s Vellas are:

Wilde City (A Modern Fae Romance)

When Willow answers a mysterious nanny ad, she’s shocked that the employer is the handsome and reclusive billionaire Severn Wilde–and even more surprised to discover he’s a fae prince in disguise. But as wondrous as Severn’s realm is, rival fae courts, witches, and shifters make it a risky job–though falling for her magical boss might be the greatest danger of all.

SCARLIGHT

As a child, Bryn was saved from wolves by a prince from a rival kingdom. Rangar’s people believe that a life saved is a soul owned, and ten years later, Rangar comes back for Bryn. Swept away to his seaside kingdom, Bryn falls under the spell of the wild Baer lands and the three magical brothers who rule it. But which prince will end up with her hand–and her heart–not even magic can foretell. 


You can find Evie on: Instagram, Her Website, Facebook, and TicToc.

Author Interview with E.D. Hackett


  1. Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house.

E.D.: Unfortunately, I haven’t ventured anywhere. I live in New England, and so many great authors have lived here, but just like any tourist attraction, when you live here, you don’t always seek out the excursions. Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Louisa May Alcott, Melville, and Emily Dickinson all grew up in New England (just to name a few). Perhaps taking a day trip and exploring all their homes is in the near future.


  1. Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

E.D.: Hands down, Ireland. My family came from Ireland, and my heart belongs there. I have been multiple times, exploring family roots and learning about my history. I am fascinated with the music, the people, and the history. My dream is to own a cottage on the Wild Atlantic Way in County Galway where I can spend my days writing.


  1. Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?

E.D.: I grab my book and take a bath. It relaxes me, resets my mind, and usually when I emerge from the bathroom, I feel inspired based upon the book I was reading.


  1. Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?

 E.D.: I am a very loose plotter, to the point where I would be called a pantser. I know the beginning, middle, and end. I have a general external problem and internal character arc that I need portrayed throughout the story. Just like life, you never know what each day will bring, so I sit down and write. Usually, my mood dictates if I write a happy section, a depressing section, or a suspenseful section, and I continue on from there.


  1. Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?

 E.D.: I have a specific way of self-editing. I first run my work through Grammarly, then ProWriting Aid, and then I have Word read it to me aloud.


  1. Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?

E.D.: I write women’s fiction, but I love romantic comedies. Some of my favorite feel-good authors are Sophie Kinsella, and I try to create stories that capture the same general feeling.


  1. Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

E.D.: I tried to write in a series because I heard that’s what readers like, and it felt forced. Now I write what inspires me. As much as I want to make a living off my writing, I write to foster my own creativity. As long as one person enjoys it, I have done my job.


  1. Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

E.D.: Don’t stop. And hire an editor. When I first started, I realize how much work, time, and money it would cost to put out a book. I considered myself a hobbyist, dabbling in writing. I didn’t hire an editor, which was a big mistake, and my readers pointed out the story flaws through their reviews. I needed that feedback. If I never published that book, I wouldn’t have had the insight to do things differently. If that book stayed on my computer, I would have stopped writing because I wouldn’t have been motivated to make my writing better.


  1. Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

E.D.: Probably joining Amazon Ad School. Ads are overwhelming, and creating ads are my least favorite time of the week, but I learned that if I didn’t advertise, my books would fall into Amazon oblivion.


  1. Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

E.D.: I would say the lion. They wake up extremely early, full of energy, and by mid-afternoon, they need a nap.


  1. Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?

E.D.: I have four finished women’s fiction novels available on Amazon in e-book, paperback, and Kindle Unlimited. When I moved to Vella, I decided to try sweet romance and romantic comedy. I have one completed and one ongoing. My women’s fiction name is E.D. Hackett, and my Vella name is Edy Hackett.


  1. Day: What does literary success look like to you?

E.D.: Quitting my day job.  Seriously. It’s really hard to juggle life with two kids, work, and my writing. I probably commit four hours a day to my writing in addition to work, and unfortunately, that interferes with my family time. If I could write while the kids are at school so I could focus on my family with all my attention in the afternoon and evening, my life would be balanced, and I would probably be a better writer and a better mother.


  1. Day: What’s the best way to market your books?

E.D.: I find live events, such as craft fairs and farmer’s markets to be most successful. I like engaging with people face to face and talking about what they are reading and what they enjoy.


  1. Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

 E.D.: My long-term plan is to experience the settings in all my books so that my descriptions are authentic. Because that isn’t always possible, I find that I spend a lot of time googling blogs, Wikipedia, and images to help me create the setting.


  1. Day: How many hours a day do you write?

E.D.: Four on the days I work and probably eight on the days I don’t. I try to only work when the family is sleeping on the weekends.


  1. Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

E.D.: I haven’t, but I hide a lot of personal experiences for my characters to experience.


  1. Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write?

E.D.: Writing about my personal health crisis in The Havoc in My Head was most challenging because it was raw and emotional, and authentic to me. I wrote that novel while I was going through the medical maze of trying to figure out what was wrong with me and how to treat it, so the book reads like a diary.


  1. Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?

E.D.: Early morning. Because of my vision impairment, I struggle to see in dim lighting. Dusk and night are terrible, and I’ve had a day of eye fatigue by the time dusk falls. When I wake up, I am ready to go, and my eyes don’t bother me nearly as much.


  1. Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

E.D.: For me, it’s all about strong characters, and I try to make my characters like friends. Someone you can relate to and are rooting for, and typically the goal behind my protagonist.


  1. Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?

E.D.: So many authors have supported me along the way, and because of their support, I am a better writer. J.E. Pace was one of the first Vella writers who supported and collaborated with me through newsletter swaps. She writes sweet romance and is an excellent writer. She has numerous books on Amazon and a few completed and ongoing Vellas. I enjoy her writing, and her stories are quite similar to mine.


E.D. Hackett Has Two Kindle Vellas:

The Unexpected Irish Fall

Rory had been mentally preparing for her semester abroad in Ireland for years. She knew exactly what she would do and when she would do it. Her entire semester was planned out, until Jaime, the annoying seatmate on her flight, showed up at her apartment with a suitcase. Was he really assigned to her apartment? And her room? Can this type-A woman learn to loosen up and love everything Ireland? Jaime’s going to show her how, but will she fall for Jaime, too?

Farmhouse Bliss

Crystal’s mother passed away and left her an old, abandoned farmhouse. When this divorcee returns home for a summer to fix it up and rid herself of the memories, Crystal finds hope and forgiveness within the walls of her old home. Crystal hires Derek, a handsome widower, to fix the house, but he’s hiding secrets of his own. Crystal can’t help but wonder if she and Derek need each other to deal with past hurts. Could her heart belong back in the place she ran from years before?


Her Book Titles Include:

The Havoc in My Head: An Inspiring Women’s Fiction Novel

She had all she expected to achieve. But a surprise hidden in her head was about to change everything…

Ashley Martin has it all. With a high-paying job, a devoted husband, and impeccable children, the ambitious woman is living the dream life she envisioned for herself. So determined to maintain her perfect existence, she hides her odd vision problems, headaches, and confusion… until one morning she wakes up blind.

Diagnosed with a brain tumor, the terrified professional faces two difficult surgeries and a year-long recovery. And as she struggles to cope with her sudden reversal of fortune, Ashley begins to see truths she never had before.

Can this tenacious woman reclaim her health and redirect her happiness?

The Havoc in My Head is a powerful and moving women’s fiction novel. If you like deeply personal journeys, overcoming impossible hurdles, and inspirational turnarounds, then you’ll love E.D. Hackett’s tale of extreme courage.

An Unfinished Story: Story One of the Block Island Saga 

Complete strangers. A bustling B&B. Can two women help each other find their dreams?

Boston. Joanie Wilson has played it safe her whole life. But her fifteen years of loyalty to the newspaper seem like they count for nothing when her boss announces the business’s impending sale. And though she doesn’t really enjoy her job, the frightened reporter fights to save it by accepting a remote assignment to write articles on local flavor.

Block Island, RI. Carly Davis longs to live on her own terms. But with her father deceased and her mother’s dementia dominating her world, the gregarious young woman feels trapped into running the family’s bed-and-breakfast. So when a desperate journalist arrives and swaps her rent for assistance with the property, Carly seizes the chance to finally take a deep breath.

As Joanie becomes immersed in the relaxed atmosphere and meets a handsome police officer, she wonders if her need for safety is costing her happiness. And as Carly grows close to her big-city tenant, she sees a new future opening before her.

Will this accidental friendship trigger the changes both women crave?

An Unfinished Story is the charming first book in The Block Island Saga women’s fiction series. If you like relatable characters, sweet romances, and beautiful settings, then you’ll love E.D. Hackett’s escape to paradise.


For more book titles, visit E.D. Hackett’s Amazon Author Page. You can also find her on Facebook, Instagram, and her Website.

Author Interview with K. Thomas

1.     Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house. 

K: I really haven’t. Most of my favorite authors are still living, and I feel invasive enough just following them on social media. I don’t know that I’d do much more than visit a gravesite when they passed. 


2.     Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

K: Any major metropolis would be fun. New York, Seoul, Paris—anything where you have a lot of movement but could find quiet, local treasures.


3.     Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?

K: Right, so every time I try to force myself to write. I reread my prior books or stories. Putting yourself back into the characters as a reader, with no pressure for word count, really helps make you think of things you want to happen. 


4.     Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?

K: Mostly a Pantser. I high-level know where things are going, but how I get there is anyone’s guess. 


5.     Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?

K: Probably how I write everything out of order. Whatever scene comes to me gets put down, then I connect the ones I want to keep and fill in the gaps. 


6.     Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?

K: Paranormal Romance is usually my go-to. When I read, it’s usually to relax and decompress, so I want a happy ending. Paranormal and fantasy romance means you get the happily-ever-after and the plot conflict is (usually) outside of the romantic relationship, which I find less stressful. 


7.     Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

K: The quick answer is that I like tropes, so it’s probably the latter. The tricky thing about giving readers “what they want,” though, is remembering just because someone reads your book, it does not make them your target reader. So, it’s best to just write what you want to happen and don’t worry about what everyone will think.


8.     Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

K: Don’t stop writing.


9.     Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

K: $35 on a snarky teacup about killing people off in books. Just kidding. Editing. There is something armor-like in knowing you used editing software and three other people checked your work when someone finds the inevitable errors. It makes you feel less alone in your imperfection (plus, it’s just one error and not a hundred!).


10.  Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

K: Is a teacup eligible?


11.  Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?

K: I’ve finished the first two books in my Time to Wake trilogy. The third is in process. I just started my Vella story, and since you have to write in order, it’s been a challenge to finish!


12.  Day: What does literary success look like to you?

K: Every time I think, “This is it. I’ve made it!” something new happens. For me, being in a library, a book box, having people love my writing, and ask when they’ll have something new is success. Being in the top 1% of millionaire best-selling authors is not a success, it’s a miracle, so I’m happy! It’s all about the baby steps.


13.  Day: What’s the best way to market your books?

K: For my genres (paranormal romance and urban fantasy), I find sneak peeks, and tidbits from the books work best. Let people read a little, and then they want to know more.


14.  Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

K: So much research. There is a two-word phrase in my second book I spent three months researching the Etruscan language to use. It’s a problem.


15.  Day: How many hours a day do you write?

K: I’m a binge-writer, so I don’t write every day. When I do write, I sit down and finish 5-10k words at a time.


16.  Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

K: Yes. Many, many secrets. The books are practically 80k words of inside jokes.


17.  Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write?

K: A character near death. I’ve had a couple, and I think I cried during both for different reasons.


18.  Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?

 K: Late at night. I don’t really have a choice. It’s when my brain cooperates.


19.  Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

 K: Selfishly, I’m going to say strong characters since that’s what I focus on writing and like to read.


20.  Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?

K: R. Raeta! She writes my favorite book boyfriends.


K. Thomas’ Kindle Vella is:

Changeling Exchange

What if the Fae controlled the world’s currency, and humanity’s fate was in the hands of a magic addict, a car thief, and the one creature that just wants to be human? An heir on the run. A heist gone awry. And a childhood romance that will be their salvation or start a war.


Her books are:

Time to Wake

Time to Wake is the award-winning first book in the Time to Wake Series.

Senlis is your typical artist. Empath, hater of mornings, and the bearer of a strange name passed down from her grandmother. With a penchant for caffeine and a pet ghost, she’s just trying to live her best life.

Did she mention she also happens to devour souls? No? Well, it’s a bit of a conversation killer… no pun intended.

When new neighbors move in across the street, Senlis strikes up an unexpected friendship with the equally quirky Katie. The two get mixed up in a party circuit that leaves a string of missing girls– and a trail back to Senlis’ less than human origins. At the center of it all is Hunter: a guy not smart enough to keep his distance. He’s arrogant, frustrating, and terribly distracting… Just, please don’t tell anyone she admitted that last part.

Is Hunter involved in the mysterious murders? Or is he just in the wrong place at the right time?

As she tries to figure out Hunter’s motives, Senlis ends up learning what it means to be a Nephilim, and how her past is playing a role in the murders. “Time to Wake” is the first book of a new-adult paranormal romance series brimming with suspense and quirky laughs!

Not Right Now

Book two of the Time to Wake series unravels the deep history between the characters while taking readers further into the lore and world of the Nephilim, with our favorite snarky caffeine-addict leading the way.


You can find K. Thomas on Facebook, Amazon, Twitter, Instagram, her Website, and Tictoc.


Author Interview with Tricia Schneider

Day: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? For Example, Hemingway’s house.

Tricia: I don’t have to go far. I live minutes away from Pottsville, Pennsylvania, perhaps best known in the literary world as the home of John O’Hara, author of Appointment in Samarra and Butterfield. He based his popular book, Gibbsville, on his hometown of Pottsville and the residents there.


Day: If you had the opportunity to live anywhere in the world for a year while writing a book that took place in that same setting, where would you choose?

Tricia: I have written books that take place in London, England, but I’ve never set foot there. Although, I’ve done a ton of research, I would love nothing more than to visit the place. Spending a year in London, or anywhere in the United Kingdom, would be a dream come true!
 


Day: Picture this: You feel uninspired while you have sat at the computer for an hour without conquering any words. How do you get your creativity flowing?


Tricia: This happens more often than I care for, to be honest. I have several methods to work through this. The best for me is taking a walk, going for a drive (although with gas prices these days – not so much lately), or taking a long shower. These work wonders for my creativity. I can usually work through any blocks or plot problems that come my way.
 


Day: Are you a plotter or a Pantser?


Tricia: I call myself a Planster. A combination of the two work best for me. When I create a story, I write everything I know about it, from characters, setting, plot, you name it. I’ll create an outline with the information I have. Typically, there are big gaping holes where I don’t know what happens. Those get filled in as I write. Most times, I have to go back and fix things as I learn more about the characters and the story. But writing this way gives me a semblance of structure and a vague guide, but still leaves a lot of surprises and what happens next questions that I love to see answered.


Day: What is your most unusual writing quirk?


Tricia: I’m not sure I have any unusual writing quirks. Sometimes, I think I’m rather boring. But I will share my experience with my writing space this last summer. I spent days cleaning out my small walk-in closet to convert half of it into an office space where I might escape from my noisy family to get my writing done. It’s beautiful with a small desk, pretty lights and a comfy chair. I was so happy when I finished, imagining my days hidden away, typing my stories. Yeah, it didn’t work out like that. My office isn’t soundproof, so the noises from the household still distract me. Plus, my 7-year-old doesn’t understand the concept of mommy-needs-to-work, so there’s plenty of distraction from him playing with his toys in my office while I’m trying to write. While I haven’t abandoned it completely, I’ve gone back to writing on my bed with my laptop or the sofa in the living room, wearing headphones to block the noise around me.


Day: What is your favorite genre to read, and why?


Tricia: I’m an avid reader, and I’ll read anything, but romance is by far my favorite. Any kind of romance. Historical, paranormal, contemporary, it doesn’t matter. I crave that happily-ever-after story. This world is filled with so many uncertainties. I need to know the characters I read about will find their happy-ever-afters since none are guaranteed in real life.


Day: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?


Tricia: Probably a combination of the two. I want to write a story that will resonate with readers, but I like to put a fresh, unique spin on my stories. Romance is filled with tropes such as enemies to lovers, arranged marriages, or second-chance love. I like to play with these tropes and see what new twists I can create with them.


Day: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?


Tricia: Stop doubting yourself. Just go for it. You can do it!


Day: What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?


Tricia: The best money I ever spent was on the few writer’s conferences I went to when I was younger and learning about the publishing industry. I met so many people, authors, and aspiring writers, and I learned a great deal from them. Attending those conferences in my early days really impacted me in a wonderful way and led me on the journey I’m currently on.


Day: As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?


Tricia: I’m not sure I would pick it for myself, but I think a spider picked me. The year I first became published, I kept encountering yellow garden spiders. These spiders are also known as writing spiders. Yes, I had to look it up. When I saw the name, I felt like someone was trying to send me a message. They are orb weavers, which means they create beautiful, intricate webs. I found several in my garden and front porch that year. Also, I found one crawling on my leg while I was driving my son home from preschool one day. No, I didn’t freak out, but it’s a good thing I like spiders! �� I think the spirits were definitely trying to get my attention.


Day: How many published and finished books/Vellas do you have?


Tricia: I’ve been published with The Wild Rose Press and some other indie publishers. I have several paranormal, historical, sci-fi, and fantasy romances published with varying lengths and heat levels. Novels to short stories. Steamy to sweet. Kindle Vella is my newest venture. Right now, I have one Vella published called Into the Dark. But I’m working on more to schedule for next year.


Day: What does literary success look like to you?


Tricia: I already feel successful. For me, I have many milestones on the way to a top goal. I’ve accomplished some such as getting a book written (yes, that counts as a success!), getting published, and making it onto the USA Today Bestseller’s list. My ultimate goal is to make enough income with my writing to pay my bills. That’s always been my dream.


Day: What’s the best way to market your books?

Tricia: I’ve been doing this for a while, but I still feel like I’m learning as I go. There are so many methods, and what works for one author may not work for another. I’ve had good luck with my newsletter subscribers and word of mouth.


Day: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Tricia: It depends on the book. I’ve spent hours reading nonfiction books and searching online articles for my historical romances. I try my best to be as accurate as possible with historical detail. With my paranormal romances, I’ve researched books about mythological and magical creatures. If I can, I like to travel to the locations for the settings of my stories. It’s wonderful to walk the same streets as my characters.
 


Day: How many hours a day do you write?


Tricia: I’m a single mom with four children between the ages of 16 and 7. My writing hours vary greatly. Over the years, I’ve learned to be flexible. Sometimes, I get an hour, and other days I might have five hours. I don’t have a set schedule. My best time for writing in the summer was early in the morning every day while my kids were asleep. Now that they’re back in school, I write more during the weekdays.


Day: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?


Tricia: Yes. I love Easter eggs! Most of my stories are interconnected in small ways, whether it’s a setting or a character. Just something minor that ties them together. Another little secret in my writing is the names I use for my characters. I grew up in the ’80s watching re-runs of the 1960s TV drama, Dark Shadows. My mother got me hooked on that show, and it influenced my life in a huge way during my formative years. My passion for the supernatural stems from storylines involving vampires, witches, werewolves, ghosts, curses, time travel, and more. To pay homage to my favorite show, I borrow names of the characters and the actors who played them and use at least one in each of my books, first or last name. It’s not something obvious, but it’s a secret that I think only Dark Shadows fans might catch if they were looking closely.


Day: What was your most harrowing scene to write?


Tricia: Anything involving the death of a loved one. My mother died from leukemia when I was 11. It’s difficult to write about loss as it brings strong memories. I discovered quite accidentally that nearly all the heroines in my stories have suffered the loss of their mother. It might not always pertain to the plot in a huge way, but I didn’t even realize I wrote them like that until someone close to me pointed it out.


Day: What is your favorite time to write, and why?
 
Tricia: My favorite time to write is whenever I’m alone in my house or when my kids are asleep. That’s the only time it’s quiet and peaceful, so I can lose myself in my story. Having four children, there’s rarely a moment when there’s not noise or chaos. Also, my house has become a haven for some of the neighborhood kids, so I typically have more than just my children in my home. At least two or three others call my house a second home and spend a lot of time with us. So much that they’ve become like part of my family. When I say it’s beyond noisy at my house, I’m not exaggerating!


Day: Do you feel like it’s most important to have A) Strong characters B) Mind-blowing Plot twists, or C) Epic settings?

Tricia: All three would be best! Usually, when I’m developing my stories, I start with the characters. I spend a lot of time learning who they are and what makes them tick. I think readers really connect with strong characters who will share their journey and take them through the epic settings and mind-blowing plot twists.


Day: Can you give a shout-out to a fellow author?


Tricia: My bestie author buddy is the amazing Ash Krafton. She’s a USA Today bestselling and award-winning author who writes speculative fiction. I’ve known her since my Waldenbooks days while I worked at the local mall. She’s not only a brilliant writer but a fantastic friend! You must check out her Demimonde series. And, I admit, I might have a teeny bit of a crush on the exorcist mage, Simon Alliant, from The Demon Whisperer series. I’m not ashamed to say that I’ve re-read those books multiple times!


Thank you so much for the interview! This was fun!


If you’re interested in learning more about Tricia’s work,

Check out her Kindle Vella:

Into the Dark

Trapped in a dimension where magic feeds from the living, Allison must trust a stranger to help her survive in this terrifying reality. Brian has lost all hope of escape. Finding Allison has given him new purpose to keep going, but for how long? As they search for a way out of this nightmarish world, will they sacrifice their newfound feelings for each other for a chance to return home? Or will they remain trapped in a world where the dead walk among the living?

To see her USA Today bestselling books, check out Tricia’s website or her blog.

And in between deadlines, she’s usually hanging out at one of these social media sites:
Facebook
Twitter
Goodreads
Bookbub
Instagram

Death’s Heir- A Kindle Vella Story

Lady Clarissa Drake can see ghosts, an ability that landed her mother in an insane asylum. To escape the stigma of her mother’s shame, she travels to America to meet her hopeful intended, but things don’t go according to plan when the ghost of his bastard half-brother’s mother shows up and forces her to confront her gift.

Click on the picture to start reading!